In the digital world, time well spent is the scarce commodity

Talk to anyone working today whether in a startup or a well-established Fortune 500 company, and they will tell you the same thing – “I’m working so hard but there aren’t enough hours in the day for me to do my job.” It’s not just that they are spending more hours working, but it’s also that…

In the digital world, good questions lead to better answers

It’s hard to argue that the speed and diversity of disruptive digital technologies doesn’t present a potential existential threat to companies of all sizes across all industries. While many organizations are still struggling to come to grips with this new competitive reality, many other are rushing off in multiple directions with multiple initiatives trying to get ahead of them or fend them off.

In the digital world, IT is an investment not a cost

Most of you reading this blog are now fully immersed in your company’s annual planning and budgeting process for 2019. Unfortunately, many IT shops still go into this exercise with a defensive mindset that tries to avoid budget reductions rather than an offensive mindset that makes a compelling business case for new technology investments.

In the digital world, knowing is as important as doing

Almost every C-level executive I speak with tells me they are so busy doing their business that they have no time to think about their business. Whether it’s the back-to-back to back meeting calendars or the explosion of digital communication tools from e-mail to texting to Twitter, executives at all levels are completely overwhelmed by the demands on their time and their schedules.

In the digital world, success requires a willingness to pivot

It’s virtually impossible to read anything business related today and not run across a call to arms for digital transformation. While there is still significant debate about what is digital transformation, one common denominator is that it represents a major shift in how a company delivers value to its customers, employees, supply chain partners and other key stakeholders.

In the digital world, sometimes less is more

Most if not all organizations no longer have the capacity to meet the accelerating demand from their customers, employees, supply chain partners and other key stakeholders for faster, friction free ways to engage and connect. From product development to marketing to sales to customer service and IT, teams with limited resources and budgets are stretched to the breaking point to try and keep up with unprecedented increases in demand.

In the digital world, employee engagement is about connecting people to purpose

Regardless of what types of products or services you provide, if your employees are not fully engaged across your end-to-end value chain, it is likely your customers are not either. Now here’s the rub…

In the new digital world, success requires a whole new game plan

The unprecedented assault of multiple waves of digital technology disruption from cloud, social, mobile, anything as a service, data analytics, machine learning and smart devices have enabled companies of any size to penetrate some portion of well-established companies’ value chains. To successfully compete in this new competitive paradigm will require companies to come up with a whole new game plan on how to organize, operate and go-to-market as a digital enterprise.

In the new digital world, you can’t succeed on your own

As I wrote in an earlier blog, historically companies believed that owning and controlling assets was the key to creating sustainable competitive advantage and building high barriers to entry into their markets and industries. However, in the new age of digital disruption, companies no longer have the capital, resources and capacity to own and operate all the assets they need to compete against well-constructed and well-orchestrated business partner ecosystems.

In the new digital world, business innovation is the new competitive imperative.

The results of KPMG’s 2016 Global CEO study delivered some very compelling evidence of how important it is for companies to leverage business innovation for their competitive advantage.

-66% of CEO’s believe that their business is at an inflection point and the next three years will be more critical than the last 50 years.
-40% of CEOs expect to be running significantly transformed companies within the next four years.
-70% of CEOs said it’s important to specifically include innovation in their business strategies.
-80% of CEOs are concerned that their existing products and services may not be relevant in 3 to 5 years’ time.
-70% of CEOs believe their organizations’ cultures do not encourage risk-taking and safe-to-fail environments.